Issue 8 November 19 2020

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WHAT JOE BIDEN’S SPEECH DISORDER MEANS FOR YOUNG AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES

‘Joey, don’t let this define you. Joey, remember who you are. Joey, you can do it,’ said Catherine Eugenia Biden to her young, stuttering son every time he would walk out. Little did she know that this young man would conquer more than just his speech disorder. He would be slated to become the 46th President of the United States of America. But it is not merely this electoral win that validates his success story. President or not, it is Joe Biden’s resilience that positions him as a hope for young Americans with disabilities…

JOE BIDEN: OUR FIRST UNASHAMEDLY DISABLED PRESIDENT

DISABILITY ADVOCATES EXPRESS JOY AFTER BIDEN NAME-CHECKS THEM WITH IMPORTANT WORD

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Government Spotlight

LEGAL BEAT: CAN AN IEP PLAN HELP YOUR CHILD?

Children with disabilities can face more challenges than others, particularly during this school year. The federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act guarantees all children with disabilities the right to a free and appropriate public education (FAPE). It covers children from birth through age 21 or completion of high school. FAPE requires that the child advance at an appropriate rate considering his or her circumstances. Students may receive special education and related services to ensure this.  An Individualized Education Plan, or IEP, documents these services, the child’s needs and the goals for the year…

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Accessible Elections

BLIND AND NEARLY DISENFRANCHISED: MY EXPERIENCE AT THE POLLS

I was fully prepared to perform my civic duty and vote on Election Day, but unfortunately the facility I was assigned to vote at was not prepared for me to cast my vote like everyone else. And why not, might you ask? Because I am blind. Yes, I am blind, but I am also an independent, competent adult who is able to compensate for my lack of vision when provided with reasonable accessibility options. I am 42-years-old. I have completed extensive schooling on the graduate and post-graduate level including degrees in mathematics, special education and administration…

 

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Current Legal Actions

UNITED STATES FILES STATEMENT OF INTEREST IN SAN JUAN SIDEWALK ACCESSIBILITY CASE

Colon v. City of San Juan, 19-cv-1837 (D.P.R.). In Betancourt-Colon, four individuals with mobility disabilities allege that San Juan has failed to install and maintain curb ramps necessary to ensure its sidewalks are accessible.  The Statement of Interest asserts the long-held position of the United States that a public entity’s provision and maintenance of public sidewalks is a covered “service” under Title II of the ADA…

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Business Accessibility

EQUITY AND ACCESSIBILITY IN THE WORKPLACE

When we discuss and make plans to promote the important issues of diversity and inclusion there are a few concepts that consistently rise to the forefront of the conversation. While cultural, gender and age-related challenges and those of racial and sexual identity exclusion are often considered, some concepts tend to get regulated into the background. Two of those are accessibility and equity, but they are equally important to consider when implementing a comprehensive diversity initiative. When you think of accessibility, what comes to mind? Ensuring your place of business complies with the American with Disabilities Act?…

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Non-Profit Accessibility

HOW FAMILIES ARE FIGHTING RACISM AND DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION

“We all thank the range of nonprofit organizations who advocate, work and provide services to people with disabilities.”

Ever since her son, Landon, was born three years ago, Nakenya Allen has been fighting. Fighting to get a diagnosis for the cause of Landon’s digestive problems, which landed him in the emergency room multiple times before he turned 18 months old. Fighting to get doctors to take her concerns about her son’s constant distress seriously. And, after he was diagnosed with a rare birth defect in his spinal cord, fighting with medical and disability service providers to get financial support for his care…

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Accessible Technology

FOR DISABLED PEOPLE, ACCESS TO ASSISTIVE TECH IS A HUMAN RIGHT NOT AN EMPLOYMENT PERK

Assistive Technology in relation to computer and IT systems can be life-changing for disabled people. Access to assistive technology can, in many cases, define the difference between full and equal access to the internet and computer operating systems and significant exclusion from any type of digital participation. Specialized technologies such as screen readers and magnification for blind and visually impaired people and text-to-speech software for individuals with dyslexia and other neurodivergent conditions go well beyond the standard accessibility features built into Microsoft and Apple computers…

 

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